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Avoid Short Sale Problems or Mistakes

by Jon Smith, CRB, CRS, GRI

When considering a short sale remember it can be a daunting task because it is a bit more complicated than a traditional home sale. Knowing and understanding what some of the common short sale mistakes are and their solutions can be very helpful for a successful outcome. below are some of the most common mistakes made with this type of transaction, and their solutions:

  • The property is not priced correctly: Be sure that your agent takes you through a detailed listing price strategy so you know exactly where your home should be priced due to its current condition, the other current sales in your area, and how much time you have left to sell. 
  • The short sale Proposal is not fully completed: Be sure that you fully understand the short sale process and exactly what your lender is looking for, so that you can present a complete and cohesive Proposal to your lender. 

Do Not Call Registry - When Will Your Number Be Removed?

by Jon Smith, CRB, CRS, GRI

Most of us are, or have been, extremely frustrated at some point with unwanted calls made by telemarketers. One way to help prevent telemarketers from calling was the creation of the Do Not Call Registry back in 2003. Individuals can register their phone numbers with the registry in hopes to eliminate these unsolicited calls to our homes and businesses.

 

There were a staggering number of registrants within the first four days of the lists launch date and continued to grow to 149 million phone numbers currently.

 

The important thing to remember is there is a term to your registration. Your registration with the Do Not Call Registry is only good for five years at which time your phone number will be removed from the list unless you renew by your renewal date. As the five year anniversary of the list is coming up in the summer of 2008, you early registrants will have to think about renewing. You can check the status of your registration by visiting the DoNotCall.gov website.

 

Read the full MSN Money Central article titled Do Not Call list about to expire.

Home Energy Tips

by Jon Smith, CRB, CRS, GRI

 

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, the typical U.S. family will spend in excess of $1,600 a year on energy costs. This amount could be lessened as a large portion of the energy used is wasted. There are a number of simple steps we can take to save energy, and money, in our homes.

 

The following energy saving tips by the U.S. Department of Energy are easy, and cost little or no money at all to implement into a new energy efficient home for you and your family.

 

  • Set your thermostat comfortably low in the winter and comfortably high in the summer. Install a programmable thermostat that is compatible with your heating and cooling system.
  • Use compact fluorescent light bulbs.
  • Air dry dishes instead of using your dishwasher's drying cycle.
  • Turn off your computer and monitor when not in use.
  • Plug home electronics, such as TVs and DVD players, into power strips; turn the power strips off when the equipment is not in use (TVs and DVDs in standby mode still use several watts of power).
  • Lower the thermostat on your hot water heater to 120° F.
  • Take short showers instead of baths.
  • Wash only full loads of dishes and clothes.
  • Look for the ENERGY STAR® label on home appliances and products. ENERGY STAR® products meet strict efficiency guidelines set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.


This is the first step in making your home “energy efficient” and will also save you money. For more information on any of the tips listed here, or to learn how you can cut your energy use up to 25%, visit the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy website for consumer tips.

 

 

 

Get a Home Inspection

by Jon Smith, CRB, CRS, GRI

Purchasing a home is one of the biggest investments you will make in your lifetime, and it can also be one of the most stressful. By having a home inspection it can help to ensure that the quality of your potential home is in good condition and help to eliminate surprises by making you aware to any problems.

So how do you go about selecting a home inspector?    One good way to start is one of the two nationally recognized professional associations for home inspectors; the American Society of Home Inspectors or The National Association of Home Inspectors.   In order to be listed with either of these organizations one has to go through a certification process. Both of these have a search engine to help you find “state certified home inspectors.”  Once you have a few names it doesn’t hurt to check with the Better Business Bureau.  Make a list of inspectors that have been recommended.  Avoiding anyone who has a negative report can help you avoid any potential problems with your inspection. 

A few things questions to ask when talking to your potential home inspector:

• What is the inspector's experience? How many years have they been in the business and how many inspections do they do a year?
 
• Exclusively inspections? Beware of contractors who do house inspections "on the side"--they may be looking for work and this isn’t necessarily what you want.

• What type of report? Will it be written or oral or both? Will the report contain suggestions for remedying deficiencies?   Preference should always be to get it in writing.

• How long will it take? Depending on the size of the house an inspection should take between 2 and 4 hours.

• What will be included in the inspection?

• What certifications do they have? Are they ASHI or NAHI certified?

 

Displaying blog entries 1-4 of 4

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Contact Information

Photo of Jon Smith, CRB, CRS, SRES, SFR Real Estate
Jon Smith, CRB, CRS, SRES, SFR
Iowa Realty
3521 Beaver Ave.
Des Moines IA 50310
515-240-2692
Fax: 515-453-6404
 

 

 

Licensed in the State of Iowa